What’s in season? – Spring

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“A fruit bowl” by Laura Bentley (8 years), 2013

Well spring is here and for most of us, that means an overhaul of our eating habits. Modifying our menus based on what’s in season is one of the best ways to eat. By choosing produce that’s in season, you will save money. You will also be eating fresher produce with a higher nutritional content.

Of course, availability of some produce will depend upon the region of Australia you live, in, but generally speaking, you can expect to find the following fruits freely available.

Fruit

Apples

Grapefruit

Mandarins

Rhubarb

Avocado

Honeydew

Mango

Strawberries

Bananas

Kiwi fruit

Mulberries

Starfruit

Blueberries

Lemons

Oranges

Tangello

Cantaloupe

Limes

Papaya

Watermelon

Cherries

Loquats

Pepino

 

Cumquats

Lychees

Pineapple

 

When it comes to vegetables, there is a huge variety to choose from, with green a common theme:

Vegetables 

Artichokes

Celery

Onions, spring

Swede

Asian greens

Choko

Parsnip

Sweet potato

Beans

Daiko

Peas

Tomato

Beetroot

Eggplant

Potatoes

Turnip

Broccoli

Fennel

Pumpkin

Watercress

Brussels sprouts

Leek

Radish

Witlof

Cabbage

Lettuce

Shallot

Zucchini

Capsicums

Mushrooms

Silverbeet

 

Carrots

Okra

Spinach

 

Cauliflower

Onions

Squash

 
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“A vegetable garden” by Laura Bentley (8 years), 2013

Remember, fruits and veggies have a range of health benefits, so don’t skimp on them when preparing your meals. The contain dietary fibre which aids digestion, keeps you regular, helps keep you full and may help protect you from a range of health problems such as heart disease, stroke, hypertension, diabetes, obesity and some gastrointestinal diseases.

They also contain many vitamins and nutrients that our body needs to function properly, so eat a wide range of differently coloured fruits and vegetables, to ensure your intake of important vitamins and minerals is sufficient.

One of the best ways to shop for produce is at your local farmer’s market. So grab your basket and load it up. Not only will you be supporting your local growers, but you will be ensuring the produce you are eating is the best money can buy.

 

 

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Help beat cancer

Daffodil DayMost of us know someone who has been touched by cancer. Cancer can affect anyone, and can be devastating for them and their loved ones.

On Friday, 22 August, you have an opportunity to make a difference to the many lives affected by cancer, by supporting Daffodil Day.

The daffodil is the symbol of hope for cancer sufferers due to its ability to push through the frozen earth to become one of the first flowers of spring. It signifies rebirth, new beginnings, vitality and growth.

According to the Cancer Council:

  • An estimated 128,000 new cases of cancer will be diagnosed in Australia this year, with that number set to rise to 150,000 by 2020.
  • The most common cancers in Australia (excluding non-melanoma skin cancer) are prostate, colorectal (bowel), breast, melanoma and lung cancer.
  • 1 in 2 Australian men and 1 in 3 Australian women will be diagnosed with cancer by the age of 85.
  • Cancer is a leading cause of death in Australia — more than 43,200 have died from cancer in 2011. Cancer accounted for 3 in 10 deaths in Australia.
  • Each day in Australia, more than 115 people will die of the disease.
  • More than 60% of cancer patients will survive more than five years after diagnosis.
  • The survival rate for many common cancers has increased by 30 per cent in the past two decades.

As a community, we can help make a positive difference to the statistics above.

Research into cancer is continually discovering new and better treatments. Cancer prevention campaigns are helping raise awareness, and early detection is improving the survival rates.

By buying Daffodil Day merchandise, or simply a lovely bunch of daffodils from the Daffodil Day volunteers, you too can play a part in the fight against cancer.

To find out how you can support this worthy cause, visit https://daffodilday.com.au/

Let’s join the fight to beat cancer.

Further information

Daffodil Day

Cancer Council

Can you go a day without your favourite food, for charity?

Ausee top 8 challengeChances are, you or someone you know suffers from a food allergy. But imagine for a moment, being allergic to most foods.

For some Australians this is a reality. Those suffering from eosinophilic gastrointestinal disorders (EGID) have to live with severely limited diets, making their life difficult socially, emotionally and physically.

EGIDS occur when higher-than-normal amounts of eosinophils (pronounced ee-oh-sin-oh fills) are found in the gastrointestinal tract. These types of white blood cells can accumulate in the gut in response to allergens (food and/or airborne), and may cause inflammation and tissue damage.

Common side effects may include difficulty eating and swallowing, poor appetite, nausea or vomiting, reflux, abdominal or chest pain, sleeping difficulties, diarrhoea, pain in lower limbs, general illnesses (e.g. ear infections, croup, migraines, fevers and colds) and sometimes behavioural changes in children.

Unfortunately, there is no cure for EGID. Management involves removing the top 8 common allergenic foods:

  • Milk
  • Eggs
  • Wheat
  • Fish
  • Peanuts
  • Tree nuts
  • Soy
  • Shellfish.

However, you can help make a difference to the lives of people with EGID.

This week is National EOS Week, run by the charitable organisation ausEE Inc. The aim is to raise awareness of eonsinophilic gastrointestinal disorders and to raise funds to help support those who suffer.

The week will culminate with Friday’s Top 8 Challenge, where Australians are encouraged to avoid all of the top 8 common allergenic foods for one meal or the whole day, and don8 to help the work of ausEE.

You can register to take the Top 8 Challenge at www.top8challenge.com

So why not get creative in the kitchen this week and help your fellow Aussies who don’t get to enjoy the wide variety of foods that most of us do.

 

Further information:

National EOS Awareness Week 

Top 8 Challenge